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9.1.2. Addresses in unilingual documents

If addresses are presented using the same structure in all linguistic versions of a publication (e.g. in a table containing a list of addresses appearing on the same page in all versions) we use the rules for multilingual works (see Section 9.1.3).

Mail destined for a country that uses a Roman alphabet

In unilingual works of the European Union institutions, bodies and organisms, addresses are usually written in the language of the publication/dispatching country. This is particularly the case for town and country names:

European Commission
Representation in Portugal
Jean Monnet Centre
1069-068 Lisbon
PORTUGAL
NB:
Use ‘NETHERLANDS’, not ‘THE NETHERLANDS’.

However, the information preceding the town and country names may also be presented in the language of the destination country; preference is to be given to that presentation as it is clearer for the postal services of the destination country:

Comissão Europeia
Representação em Portugal
Largo Jean Monnet

1069-068 Lisbon
PORTUGAL

With a view to avoiding problems during transit through an intermediate country, it is recommended to add the name of the destination country (and possibly the town) in an internationally recognised language. For example, in the case of an item sent from Poland to Germany:

Herrn E. Muller
Goethestr. 13
22767 Hamburg
NIEMCY/GERMANY

In Bulgarian and Greek works, addresses are written in Roman characters, if possible in the language of the destination country, otherwise in English.

Mail destined for a country that does not use a Roman alphabet (non-EU country)

For mail destined for a non-EU country that does not use a Roman alphabet (China, Japan, Saudi Arabia, etc.) the address, notably the country name, is written in an internationally recognised language (often English); the part of the address concerning the street may be written using a simple Roman transliteration:

European Commission
Representation in Beijing
15 Dong Zhi Men Wai Daije, Sanlitun
100600 Beijing
CHINA

Mail destined for an EU Member State that does not use a Roman alphabet (Bulgaria, Greece and Cyprus)

In English works, addresses for mail destined for Bulgaria, Greece or Cyprus are written in Roman characters (with transliteration if necessary, for example, of the street name).

European Commission
Representation in Bulgaria
Moskovska 9
1000 Sofia
BULGARIA
European Commission
Representation in Greece
Vassilissis Sofias 2
106 74 Athens
GREECE
European Commission
Representation in Cyprus
Iris Tower, 8th Floor
Agapinoros 2
1076 Nicosia
CYPRUS

In Bulgarian and Greek works, the town and country names must be added in Roman characters (in English).

Европейска комисия
Представителство
в България
ул. „Московска“ № 9
1000 София/Sofia
БЪЛГАРИЯ/BULGARIA
Ευρωπαϊκή Επιτροπή
Αντιπροσωπεία
στην Ελλάδα
Βασιλίσσης Σοφίας 2
106 74 Αθήνα/Athens
ΕΛΛΑΔΑ/GREECE
Ευρωπαϊκή Επιτροπή
Αντιπροσωπεία
στην Κύπρο
Iris Tower, 8ος όροφος
Αγαπήνωρος 2
1076 Λευκωσία/Nicosia
ΚΥΠΡΟΣ/CYPRUS

The particular case of the Brussels Capital Region

In works of the European Union institutions, bodies and organisms, the presentation of addresses for mail destined for the bilingual Brussels Capital Region must adhere to the following rules.

Unilingual works in French or Dutch
French
(addresses in FR only)


Conseil de l’Union européenne
Rue de la Loi 175
1048 Bruxelles
BELGIQUE
Dutch
(addresses in NL only)


Raad van de Europese Unie
Wetstraat 175
1048 Brussel
BELGIË
Unilingual works in another EU language

The first part of the address can be written either in the bilingual format or in one language, preferably one that is recognised at international level. However, the names of the street, town and country must appear in the bilingual format:

Conseil de l’Union européenne/
Raad van de Europese Unie
Rue de la Loi/Wetstraat 175
1048 Bruxelles/Brussel
BELGIQUE/BELGIË
Council of the European Union
Rue de la Loi/Wetstraat 175
1048 Bruxelles/Brussel
BELGIQUE/BELGIË

Addresses in French-speaking countries

In Belgium, France and Luxembourg, the presentation of the street name and number follow different principles which must be respected.

BELGIUM
Rue de la Source 200
Street name followed by the number (without a comma)
FRANCE
24 rue de l’Allée-au-Bois
Number followed by street name (without a comma)
LUXEMBOURG
2, rue Mercier
Number followed by street name (with a comma)
Last updated: 29.8.2019
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